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dictionary of american slang

The Dictionary of American Slang, Ctd.





commfu: n. Complete monumental military fuck-up. W.W.II Armed Forces use; euphemistic acronym formed by analogy with “snafu”


(I thought this was appropriate given the latest news from Afghanistan.)

The Dictionary of American Slang

sin-hound: n. A chaplain. Some prison and Army use c1920. 





The Dictionary of American Slang, Ctd.

wind pudding: Nothing to eat. Usu. in phrase “to live on wind pudding” = to have nothing to eat and no means of getting anything. Hobo use. 





The Dictionary of American Slang, Ctd.

read one’s plate: 1. To say grace or give thanks at mealtime. Southern hill use. 2. To eat in silence; to be forced to eat in silence as punishment.

The Dictionary of American Slang, Ctd.

lunch-hooks:  n. pl. 1. The hands, the fingers. Most common c1900.  2 The teeth. Some c1900 use. 3. Fig., adverse or critical remarks. 1952: “It is difficult to caricature Mickey Spillane. But [Ira] Wallach [in his Hopalong-Freud Rides Again] has managed to get a set of predatory lunch-hooks into him.” G. Millstein in N.Y. Times Bk. Rev., Sept. 14, 7/1.